Twitter Tweets Twittering

Similarly as you are trying to establish your expertise, there are other industry experts using Twitter as well. You can connect with other experts in your field and ask them questions. By having your questions answered, you can learn new things and broaden your industry knowledge even more. If you come from the old school of thinking, a brand takes a lot of money and time to create. With today’s online business, however, it can be attained with the right combination.

Get a WordPress blog so you can use the WordPress Retweet button. This features allows your visitors to post a link to one of your articles in their Twitter feed in a simple click. You could also add Retweet buttons on your website if you take the time to code it yourself. In a nutshell, microblogging (also known in its hyphenated form: micro-blogging) is an Internet-based communication that is distinctive for its short and constant messaging.

Usually, a microblogger joins a microblogging site (see below for the options), gathers a group of fellow micro-bloggers around him who ‘follow’ him, and periodically changes his ‘blog’ to reflect what he is doing. The main difference is that social media is not a monologue. It is a dialogue that the brand sometimes does not lead. People are talking online http://blogs.elpais.com/china-red/2014/06/zara-vender%C3%A1-por-internet-en-china-en-la-plataforma-tmall.html right now – and this is an aspect of social media marketing. Posting too much.

Using your Twitter regularly is a good thing, but be careful not to overdo it. If it would get your banned in a chatroom, avoid it on Twitter. It’s bad to post five times in a row. It’s worse to do it every day. Posting too much in a day or posting several times in a row are bad business strategies you should always avoid. If you must, leave one or two hours between tweets, and make sure the content is relevant. And as always, trim down any retweets, as it counts as repetitive information that no one likes to hear.

Yammer ties in with the concept of flat organisations, in which senior management is more closely connected to the rest of the work force. Is that sort of approach realistic for larger companies?

Advertisements